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Maverick Adams
Maverick Adams

The Routledge Companion To Eighteenth Century P...



"A superb volume on eighteenth-century philosophy and a welcome addition to the Routledge Philosophy Companions series. The contributors are top-notch scholars in the field, and the choice and breakdown of topics is original and creative. It should be of great use to both students and seasoned experts." - Steven Nadler, University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA




The Routledge Companion to Eighteenth Century P...



"A superb collection, imaginatively conceived and expertly realized. Impressively comprehensive in its handling of recent scholarship on the history of eighteenth-century thought, the Companion also asks new questions about the relationship between philosophy and the arts and sciences in the European Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment. The result is a gift to students and essential reading for scholars of modern and early modern philosophy." - Thomas Holden, University of California-Santa Barbara, USA


"A unique collection that embraces the eclecticism and innovation of a period in which philosophy rapidly and repeatedly reconceived itself. By adapting and combining the methodologies of a variety of schools the moderns developed a nimble, creative, and expansive philosophy. This Companion captures that vitality, and in doing so it is the most comprehensive and historically sensitive survey of eighteenth-century philosophy available." - Rebecca Copenhaver, Lewis & Clark College, USA


Enormously rich and wide-ranging, The Routledge Companion to Britain in the Eighteenth Century brings together, in one handy reference, a wide range of essential information on the major aspects of eighteenth century British history.


The information included is chronological, statistical, tabular and bibliographical, and the book begins with the eighteenth century political system before going on to cover foreign affairs and the empire, the major military and naval campaigns, law and order, religion, economic and financial advances, and social and cultural history.


Jeremy Gregory is Senior Lecturer in the History of Modern Christianity in the School of Arts, Histories and Cultures at The University of Manchester. He has published widely on religion and culture in the eighteenth century and is currently co-editor of Studies in Church History.


N2 - This chapter focuses on ports as sites of local and global contact where the circulation of information, policies, material goods and people emerged as a constant reality. The discussion centers on how, through the written and visual representation of ports as mobile and fluid spaces, coloniality was shaped and sustained on the basis of racial, social, and economic interactions. This chapter will enable readers to understand how space works as a critical tool to underline the ways in which Spanish America was viewed, understood, and discursively produced to the rest of the world in the late eighteenth century.


AB - This chapter focuses on ports as sites of local and global contact where the circulation of information, policies, material goods and people emerged as a constant reality. The discussion centers on how, through the written and visual representation of ports as mobile and fluid spaces, coloniality was shaped and sustained on the basis of racial, social, and economic interactions. This chapter will enable readers to understand how space works as a critical tool to underline the ways in which Spanish America was viewed, understood, and discursively produced to the rest of the world in the late eighteenth century.


Her research, previously funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the Wellcome Trust, and The Austrian Academic Exchange Service, explores the formulation of music as a language of emotions and its particular role in educational theories and policies since the eighteenth century. Having worked on aesthetic and educational ideals in Viennese salons of the late 18th century during her PhD, she now focusses on Britain in the late Georgian period, exploring music in domestic settings with a particular focus on arrangements of large-scale works, and domestic devotional music. Her interest in music as a social activity extends outwards from the domestic to the development and meaning of amateur choral societies in England.


Thormählen, W. (2014)Lamenting at the piano: domestic music-making and well-being in eighteenth-century Britain. Göttingen Händel-Beiträge, 15. pp. 144-160. ISSN 0177-7319 (print) 2197-330X (online)


Thormählen, W. (2020)Feel-good tunes: music aesthetics, performance and well-being in the eighteenth century. In: Lifestyle and Medicine in the Enlightenment: The Six Non-Naturals in the Long Eighteenth Century. Routledge Studies in the History of Science, Technology and Medicine . Routledge, Abingdon. ISBN 9781138610705 (hardback) 9780429465642 (e-book)


Kirby received his PhD in English with a certificate in Native American and Indigenous Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2012. His research interests include Native American literary, intellectual, and cultural production from the late eighteenth century to the present, Indigenous critical theory, and studies in sovereignty/self-determination, nationhood/nationalism, modernism/modernity, and genre. Essays in contemporary Indigenous critical theory, constitutional criticism in Native literatures, and Native interventions in the Western and in Modernist Studies have appeared in a variety of venues including Studies in American Indian Literatures, The Routledge Companion to Native American Literature, Texas Studies in Language and Literatures, Western American Literature, and Modernism/modernity.


My primary research and teaching areas include Native American and Indigenous writing and cultural production from the late eighteenth century to the present, Indigenous critical theory, and studies in nationhood/nationalism, sovereignty/self-determination, modernism/modernity, and genre. More broadly, I am interested in the politics of race, nation, citizenship, and belonging in ethnic American writing and the relationships between narrative form, cultural representation, public policy, and the law.


My primary fields of research include eighteenth-century British literature, disability and queer studies, deaf studies, and sound studies. My research examines the literary histories of deafness and disability from the eighteenth century forward. I also have a secondary interest in queer literature and poetry leading up to and following the Stonewall Riots (1969). I enjoy teaching a range of classes in eighteenth-century literature, gothic fiction and film, and disability and LGBTQ+ studies. My courses routinely challenge students to think transhistorically about intersections of disability, sexuality, gender, and race in the literature and theory we read together. I prioritize accessibility in my classrooms and I also seek to build communities of care and foster collaborative intellectual endeavor. 041b061a72


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